Posts tagged fat free
How to lose weight over the Christmas period!
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Nothing beats a warming glass of mulled wine or a sugar-laden mince pie at Christmas. But with so many delectable treats on show, it can be difficult to keep on track! So we’ve put together a few tips to help you stay on track!

 

1.       “Free-from”

With so many over-processed temptations available at Christmas, it’s far too easy for our bodies to become clogged up with artificial nasties. Try using ‘free from’ alternatives for traditional Christmas recipes. For example, when it comes to stuffing, don’t think breadcrumbs, think, quinoa or rice!

 

2.       Breakfast like a king!

You’ve heard it a hundred times before, but skipping breakfast will give you hunger pangs that quickly leave you reaching for chocolate, crisps and fizzy drinks to boost those energy levels!

Studies at the University of Leeds found that eating earlier in the day helps to prevent people from getting hungry, losing control and overeating in the evening. But what if you never feel hungry in the morning? Chances are, if you can last until mid morning or lunchtime before eating, you're having too much to eat in the evening - I guarantee if you have a smaller dinner, earlier in the evening, you'll wake up with a ravenous appetite!

 

3.       Coconuts!

Nothing sends cholesterol levels through the roof like Christmas! So save yourself the heart clogging worry by leaving the butter in the fridge and opting for coconut oil for basting! Also try drizzling your Christmas pudding with dairy-free coconut yoghurt, a delicious and light alternative to brandy butter!

 

4.       Portion control

For the ideal Christmas lunch, stick to these portions on your plate!

-          50% vegetables, such as carrots, broccoli, brussel sprouts, cabbage

-          40% protein, such as, turkey or beef

-          10% treats, such as Yorkshire puddings, pigs in blankets, stuffing, roast potatoes and gravy

 

5.       Clever tricks

Take the edge off of your hunger and fill up before a party to avoid over eating! We recommend snacking on one of the following:

-          Handful of walnuts

-          Handful of almonds

-          A slice of wholemeal toast and peanut butter

-          One boiled egg

We often mistake thirst for hunger too, so make sure you drink plenty of water before a meal or party!

 

6.       A little extra

-          Don’t snack in front of the tv. We often eat as many as 300 extra calories whilst sitting in front of the tv!

-          Beware of huge wine glasses. Drink out of a smaller wine glass will restrict your intake of calories

-          Swap  a serving of Baileys (180kcal) for a glass of Champagne (110kcal)

-          Swap a mince pie (240kcal) for a slice of Yule log (186kcal)

-          Swap 30g Stilton (130kcal) for 30g Camembert (90kcal)

-          Swap a handful of Pringles (280Kcal) for a handful of Twiglets (190Kcal

Fat or fat-free? The truth about "fat"

For years we have been told that you are what you eat.

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If you eat fat, you'll be fat.

There are "fat-free," "low-fat," "light," and "reduced-fat" products available. Here's what those terms mean:

  • "Fat-free" foods must have less than 0.5 gram of fat per serving.
  • "Low-fat" foods must have 3 grams of fat or less per serving.
  • "Reduced-fat" foods must have at least 25% less fat than regular versions of those foods.
  • "Light" foods must have either 1/3 fewer calories or 50% less fat.

When I tell my clients, friends and family to eat fat they often look at me like I’m crazy! But before you run a mile, hear me out on this one…

When you eat products that are low in fat or ‘”fat free”, a lot of the time what this actually means is “high in sugar”. When food companies extract fat from their products not only does it make it “fat free”, but also “taste free”. To make up for that, food makers tend to pour other ingredients -- especially sugar, flour, thickeners, and salt -- into the products. Adding up those calories!

While all fats seem to have been given a bad name, the only ones you need to be avoiding are trans fats and saturated fats.

Consuming a diet high in these fats can lead to high cholesterol levels in the blood, which can cause health conditions such as heart disease, heart attacks and strokes.

It's a good idea to eat less saturated fat, or swap foods high in saturated fat for small amounts of foods containing unsaturated fats, to reduce the health risks linked with high cholesterol levels.

Which foods contain these fats?

  • butter, lard and ghee (oil made from butter)
  • fatty meats and meat products, such as sausages and pies
  • cream, sour cream, crème fraîche and ice cream
  • cheese, particularly hard cheese
  • some savoury snacks, such as pork scratchings 
  • biscuits, cakes and pastries
  • chocolates and some sweets 

So what should I be eating?

The good news is that there are plenty of delicious and healthy fats to enjoy. Healthy fats – also known as monounsaturated fats, and polyunsaturated fats – not only keep you fuller for longer, but also nourish your body, and curb your sugar cravings.

Enjoy things like;

  • olive oil, rapeseed oil and their spreads
  • avocados
  • some nuts, such as almonds, brazils and peanuts
  • oily fish, such as, mackerel, salmon, sardines, fresh tuna

Why are these healthy fats so good for me?

  • Provide essential fatty acids that your body can’t produce itself
  • Are a concentrated source of energy
  • Help maintain your cell membranes
  • Keep the nervous system in working order
  • Boost the body’s immune system
  • Enables the body to absorb super important fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K!

 

So next time you’re out shopping, read the food labels. Before eating a fat-free food, make sure the product isn't loaded with sugar or additives, and that it's actually lower in calories than the regular version!

SH

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